Rock hopping for lunch!

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So, picture the scene. It’s 06:30, the sun’s been up for a couple of hours and there’s not a breath of wind.  We’ve untied the lines and we’re motoring out of the harbour at the start of our day out to îles Chausey.  I was simply bursting with excitement! There was just one little problem; this time I’m on a 37 foot sailing yacht and no wind means we’re going to end up motoring the whole way.  It’s been an awfully long time since a day at sea with no wind hasn’t put a smile on my face.

Never mind.  We are on a boat, the sun is out and our destination is a collection of tiny little islands just off the coast of Normandy and lunch is booked for 12:30, French time; does it get better than this, I ask myself? Definitely not!

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I can’t remember the last time I was out on a yacht but it was most certainly a while back.  I’d forgotten how serene it can be.  We ghosted along at a sedate 6 knots through the water and the tide added a couple more to help us on our way.  Slicing through the waves instead of feeling every little bump made a lovely change. We chatted and drank coffee and chatted some more and watched the Condor ferry come past at 9 million knots as it made ready to swallow the yacht in its path…

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Then we rounded the first of our waypoints and started the second leg of the route. Once we’d passed the NE Minquiers cardinal we headed south to pass west of Chausey before turning east along the bottom of the islands.

IMGP1830hi resLooking back towards Jersey with NE Minquiers in the foreground

Gradually, we got closer and Chausey started to become more defined through the high- pressure haze.  I guess it should have come as no surprise that it looked to me just like the Minquiers and the Ecrihous but I was still superbly excited nevertheless.  There is something magical about sailing to a group of rocks barely clear of the surrounding sea, with a few houses, a restaurant, a couple of shops and precious little else.

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The last leg along the south of the main island, Grande îletook no time at all but before we reached the bay where we’d decided to anchor, we got a distant glimpse of the house built by the Renault family many years ago.

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Finally, nearly 4 hours after we left the marina in Jersey, we pulled up and started choosing a suitable spot to anchor.  In short- order the pick was down, the dinghy inflated and a serpentine row later we were on the shore with soft white sand underfoot.

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We had surely arrived at paradise. I know the weather plays a huge part in making places that ordinarily seem average, look like they’ve been crafted by planet manufacturers to appear flawless but I reckon this little island would be special even in the pouring rain. On the other hand, it might just be that I’m so excited…

Lunch was over an hour away, so we set off on a tour of the island.  I’m not going to describe what you can see for yourselves, I’m simply going to put some shots up.

Enjoy!

It really isn’t a huge island and it wasn’t long before we’d done the tour and were sitting at a table with a view in the restaurant/hotel (Hotel du Fort et des Iles).  You’d imagine a business with little or no competition might rest on its laurels but the food was excellent if mostly fish dishes.  Incidentally, the desserts were to die for!

Soon after lunch, we headed back to the boat.

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By now the wind had picked up and we knew we were in for a proper sail on the way back – this day just kept getting better and better.

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What a wonderful way to spend a sunny summer’s Saturday!  If you keep your boat in the Channel Islands and you’ve never been to Îles Chausey then it’s about time you remedied that.  If you normally do your boating somewhere further afield then a visit to the Channel Island has to be on your wish list for this summer and whilst you’re so close, get yourselves down to Îles Chausey.

This has been another Captain Corbett’s Adventure.  If I’m not on Jersey teaching a private tuition Day Skipper theory or Yachtmaster theory course, then I’m either spending time with someone on their boat, giving them the confidence to take their boat out with their family and friends on board or I’m off somewhere exotic delivering a boat. Either way, I’ll write it up and put it on the Blog for you all to see, so keep popping back to see my most recent adventures.

Here we go again…

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Just before Christmas 2013, Lynn, my chief number one crew and I headed off to a small island off the Brittany coast. We were going to tackle the obviously impossible task of moving a boat up the Bay of Biscay in a tiny gap in the disastrous weather we’d been suffering for weeks. When I wrote about the trip I entitled it, ‘What price a life?’ as it made me think very seriously about the merits of going out to sea when it is rough.  Well, would you believe it, here I am again to tell you about the same route, the same model of boat but much, much better weather?

One of the things I learned about this trip the last time I made it, was that accessibility to this section of the French coast line is not easy using public transport. I don’t think I’ve ever used so many coaches and trains getting back and forth from a boat.  Fortunately, this time it was quite straight forward but still, more involved than just getting into a car and driving to the marina. I set off on Friday evening, on the ferry to St Malo.  Staying overnight in a hotel opposite the station made it easy to stroll across the road the next morning and virtually walk straight onto the waiting train without so much as adjusting the speed of my step. Less than an hour later and I was in Rennes. The next train got me to Nantes and then a coach took me the rest of the way to Noirmoutier.  Not bad really but when you consider I started travelling on Friday evening at 18:30 and it was now 16:30 the following day, it does seem like a long journey for such a short distance across the globe, especially when we keep getting told how small the world is these days.

So, Bill, the owner of the new Swift Trawler 50, was waiting to greet me when I arrived. As we walked to the boat, we discussed the plan and the weather and came to an amicable agreement that we would go ‘balls out’, given the favourable weather conditions, to get to Guernsey on the second day to collect Bill’s wife.  Jane was planning to come across on the ferry from Poole and complete the last leg with us.  Personally, given the distances involved, I would have preferred to have split the trip into three legs, allowing a day for each but Bill was on a mission and as long as it’s not dangerous, I’m happy to help.

The following morning, at 06:20 sharp, we left the marina on the first leg of our trip.  It was supposed to be 06:00 sharp but neither of us had had much sleep – new boats don’t come with bedding and pillows and rolling clothes up to make a pillow is only slightly successful. It started off fairly flat but as we got a couple of miles off we encountered the standard swell from the SW that plagues Atlantic facing shores and what was left of the previous few days wind blowing at a slight angle across the top of the swell.  This made it slightly lumpy but the semi-displacement keel on the Swift Trawler kept it comfortable.  Our target was Roscoff and if we could keep up a steady 12-15 knots this was going to take us about 12 hours – long day, especially after a night of very little sleep.  As it happened, we had patches of extremely smooth water and made the Raz de Sein just after 13:30.

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Lighthouse & West Cardinal marker at the Raz de Sein

Skimming across the water at 18 knots and over the ground at 15 knots was a little disappointing but we’d had a good run so far and it was inevitable we’d hit some foul tide at some stage. Nevertheless, it wasn’t long before we’d passed in front of Brest and made our way around the westerly tip of Finistère. We were now on the home run into Roscoff.  By the time we got in, the sea was like a mill pond and what wind there had been, had subsided. At this time of year, this really should have been a clue…

A tip for any motor yachts thinking of staying over in Roscoff – the diesel pump will only dispense €300 worth of diesel in one go.  We had to go through the process for refuelling eight times before we had filled the boat up!

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Sat on the fuel berth after our lengthy filling up session

Roscoff seemed to be a sleepy little marina – quite clean and contemporary looking but nobody about.  The restaurant stopped serving early so we had no choice but to stroll into town.  In fairness, it was only the 20 minutes the restaurant owner said it was.

Over the hill and down towards the town centre is a lovely and clearly affluent street of houses, punctuated by something I’ve not seen growing in such neatly aligned rows and in such quantities before – a field of Artichokes!

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Past the artichokes and a little further towards the ‘centre ville’ and the vista opens up to reveal the old port (drying) and the town tucked behind it. Here’s a couple of shots of the entrance to the old port.

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The next day we woke up to pea-soup fog! Advection Fog is common at this time of year. The warm, moist winds coming across the Atlantic are chilled as they encounter the waters around northern France and the UK which are still cold from the winter.  (Water takes a long time to change temperature and is at it’s coldest in the early months of the year, not warming up properly until September, October).

In busy commercial waters I would be very hesitant about setting sail in thick fog but this was a week day now and the only craft we were likely to meet were the local fishermen.  We had radar, AIS and two huge plotters to view it all on – off we jolly well went.  I reckon we were the only boat blowing it’s horn out there but it made us feel righteous. After an hour, we drove out of the fog and left it hanging in the air behind us. We had popped out into a sunny day of cloudless blue skies and flat calm waters; how lovely, Guernsey here we come.

Sadly, Jane couldn’t make it in the end, which was probably just as well as it got really lumpy going around the Les Casquets . The tide would have been against us going through the Alderney Race and with a slight wind over tide effect it would have been pretty rough there too, so we chose the Casquets route but honestly, it was rough enough to slow us down to 7 knots at one point and I seriously wonder if the Race might have been a better option.

Once we’d crossed the shipping lanes and made it to half way across the Channel it smoothed off enough for us to get back up to 18 knots.  From there on in it was pretty uneventful and so, just after 16:30 we arrived in Poole. A successful , speedy, slightly foggy crossing and one very happy owner!

This has been another Captain Corbett’s Adventure.  If I’m not on Jersey teaching a private tuition Day Skipper theory or Yachtmaster theory course, then I’m either spending time with someone on their boat, giving them the confidence to take their boat out with their family and friends on board or I’m off somewhere exotic delivering a boat. Either way, I’ll write it up and put it on the Blog for you all to see, so keep popping back to see my most recent adventures.

 

Manhattan in Turkey

 

© Richard Corbett 2014

I arrived in KaŞ, in the Antalya region of Turkey, just as the guys were finishing the technical handover on Wild Thyme Too.  My role was to get Stewart, the new owner, signed off for an ICC and to lend a helping hand as everyone got used to using their new luxury motor yacht.

Crystal clear water, clear blue skies, not a breath of wind and a brand new Sunseeker – now that’s a combination made in heaven.

With the technical handover complete, it was now up to me to add the finishing touches to the new boat experience.  Firstly, this meant an afternoon of drawing on charts and trying to remember the rules of the road.  Poor Stewart, after all the information he’d had to absorb during the handover, I really did wonder if it was all going to be too much but we were soon through the theoretical part of the test and looking forward to our trip the following day.

At 8am the next morning we’d all gathered as arranged and set-to with preparing to go to sea. This meant covers off, engine checks, safety brief and a plan for leaving the dock.  Unfortunately, my plans for testing Stewart on his departure from the dock were interrupted by the marina staff, who insisted on taking control of the lines on departure and as I found out later, on arrival too!  It seems that you just have to get the boat close to your berth and they do the rest.

Is this the height of laziness or a service that every marina should adopt – answers on a postcard please?

© Richard Corbett 2014

Captain Ergun and his first mate Merve (his wife), who run Boat Trip Turkey, are going to help Stewart and his family to make sure their times on Wild Thyme Too are always wonderful and hassle free.  It was Ergun’s idea for us to go around to Simena & Kekova for lunch and I have to concede that as we nipped around the coast, slipped between two islands into a protected lagoon and tied up at a jetty with a delightful restaurant attached to it, I realised that Stewart has found himself a very handy man to know.

© Richard Corbett 2014

There must be literally thousands of amazing bays and inlets and restaurants and beaches and all manner of places to explore on this coastline; this lovely family are going to have many years of incredible boating on their Manhattan 55…

By the time we’d returned to the marina the practical section of the test was complete and Stewart had passed with flying colours. Everyone was feeling really comfortable with the boat; my time here was done and it was time for me to leave.  I said my goodbyes and headed off for the airport but I just couldn’t resist one more look at this boating Utopia.

© Richard Corbett 2014

This has been another Captain Corbett’s Adventure.  If I’m not on Jersey teaching a private tuition Day Skipper theory or Yachtmaster theory course, then I’m either spending time with someone on their boat, giving them the confidence to take their boat out with their family and friends on board or I’m off somewhere exotic delivering a boat. Either way, I’ll write it up and put it on the Blog for you all to see, so keep popping back to see my most recent adventures.