Schoolboy error #1 (there may be more!)

old-sven-the-tide-checker

Nuff said!

This has been another Captain Corbett’s Adventure.  If I’m not on Jersey teaching a private tuition Day Skipper theory or Yachtmaster theory course, then I’m either spending time with someone on their boat, giving them the confidence to take their boat out with their family and friends on board or I’m off somewhere exotic delivering a boat. Either way, I’ll write it up and put it on the Blog for you all to see, so keep popping back to see my most recent adventure.

Hamptonne Country Life Museum

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Gosh! These posts are coming thick and fast at the moment aren’t they? Anyway, yesterday, being a bank holiday, we decided to do the tourist thing and visit one of the heritage sites on Jersey.  Jersey Heritage are a local charity who protect and promote the heritage and uniqueness of Jersey.  The Hamptonne Country Life Museum is one of the sites administered by Jersey Heritage and well worth a visit if you ever find yourself on this beautiful island.

I’m not going to rattle on about Hamptonne or what we had for afternoon tea.  Instead, I’m just going to put up a selection of pictures, enjoy.

This has been another Captain Corbett’s Adventure.  If I’m not on Jersey teaching a private tuition Day Skipper theory or Yachtmaster theory course, then I’m either spending time with someone on their boat, giving them the confidence to take their boat out with their family and friends on board or I’m off somewhere exotic delivering a boat. Either way, I’ll write it up and put it on the Blog for you all to see, so keep popping back to see my most recent adventure.

2015 London Boat Show

Good morning all.  Just a quick note about my visit to the London Boat Show yesterday.

It was definitely good to go to the show, if only to catch up with some ex-Sealine colleagues and some of my other industry friends and acquaintances but one thing that really struck me was how small the show is now.  I remember when the show moved from Earl’s Court to Excel.  That first year both of the halls were packed to the gunwales with all things boating and if memory serves, the south hall was almost entirely given over to motor boats – how different it is now, shame.

The industry powerhouses, Sunseeker and Princess dominated the show.  Sadly the Sealine stand looked a little forlorn, a shadow of our heyday but nevertheless, it was good that they were there at all. What did surprise me was the Fairline stand; running along the end wall, with some lovely boats on show but again, not a patch on previous years stands – gone are the days of Fort Fairline then…a sensible belt tightening exercise in these difficult times I suspect.

The busiest area was, of course, the usual array of chandlers, sea schools and paraphernalia stands. Squirreled away amongst all this lot, was one particularly pleasing find, Motorboat Owner.  Neale and Claire, who some of you will know from their MBM days have set up a digital magazine aimed squarely at motor boaters.  This new offering is designed to bring insight and comment for all practical aspects of running a motor boat.  What’s more, it appears to be absolutely free – how could you resist not signing up?

All in all a worthwhile visit and an enjoyable day out – if you have the chance to go, do.  The industry is for you, the boaters of this world and if you don’t support it you will lose the flexibility and choice that come from having a buoyant (excuse the pun) industry.  If you don’t believe me, consider the high street shops that we all used to use…

This has been another Captain Corbett’s Adventure.  If I’m not on Jersey teaching a private tuition Day Skipper theory or Yachtmaster theory course, then I’m either spending time with someone on their boat, giving them the confidence to take their boat out with their family and friends on board or I’m off somewhere exotic delivering a boat. Either way, I’ll write it up and put it on the Blog for you all to see, so keep popping back to see my most recent adventures.

The next time you doubt your ability to do something…

Little Tommy Morrissey loves to play golf and he’s not going to let something like not having a complete right arm to get in his way.

I was sent this video recently and could barely believe what I saw when I played it.  This courageous young lad should be an inspiration to us all.

The next time you begin to doubt your ability to accomplish something, think about Tommy’s approach to difficult situations and then think again how you can overcome your own self-doubt.

Watch and be amazed…

http://player.theplatform.com/p/BxmELC/gc_player/select/I_6m3VpqoakQ

This has been another Captain Corbett’s Adventure.  If I’m not on Jersey teaching a private tuition Day Skipper theory or Yachtmaster theory course, then I’m either spending time with someone on their boat, giving them the confidence to take their boat out with their family and friends on board or I’m off somewhere exotic delivering a boat. Either way, I’ll write it up and put it on the Blog for you all to see, so keep popping back to see my most recent adventures.

Pass it on…

This made me smile, in a ‘Grumpy Old Man’ sort of way, so I thought I’d share it with all of you…

***

At the store checkout desk, the young cashier suggested to the much older woman, that she should bring her own shopping bags because plastic bags weren’t good for the environment.

The woman apologized and explained, “We didn’t have this ‘Green thing’ back in my day.”
The young checkout girl responded, “That’s why we have a problem today. Your generation did not care enough to save the environment for future generations”.

 

Was she right – did we not have the ‘Green Thing’ in our day?

 

  • Back then, we returned milk bottles, pop bottles and beer bottles to the store. The store sent them back to the plant to be washed and sterilized and refilled. This way, it could use the same bottles over and over again – they really were recycled.
  • Grocery stores bagged our groceries in brown paper bags, which we reused for numerous things, most memorable, besides household garbage bags, was the use of brown paper bags as book covers for our schoolbooks. This was to ensure that public property (the books provided for our use by the school) was not defaced by our scribbling.  In fact, we were able to put whatever graffiti we liked on the brown paper covers instead of using railway bridges and canal tunnels and everywhere else the young people of today decide is a suitable place to display their ‘art’.

 

But we didn’t have the “Green Thing” back in our day, did we?

 

  • We walked up stairs because we didn’t have an escalator in every store and office building.
  • We walked to the shops and didn’t climb into a 300-horsepower machine every time we had to travel two streets away.

But we didn’t have the “Green Thing” back in our day, did we?

 

  • Back then, we washed (heaven forbid) the baby’s nappies because we didn’t have the throwaway kind. We dried clothes on a line, not in an energy-gobbling machine burning up 220 volts of electricity – wind and solar power really did dry our clothes.
  • Children had ‘hand-me-down’ clothes from their brothers or sisters, not the brand new, ‘branded’ clothing they get every time their current wardrobe starts to stand up on its own.

 

But we didn’t have the “Green Thing” back in our day, did we?

  • We had one TV or radio in the house, not a TV in every room. The TV had a sensible sized screen, a screen the size of a pillow perhaps, not a screen the size of Wales.
  • In the kitchen, we blended and stirred by hand because we didn’t have electrical machinery to do everything for us.
  • When we packaged a fragile item to send in the post, we used screwed up old newspapers to protect it, not Styrofoam or plastic bubble wrap.
  • In our day, we didn’t fire up an engine and burn fuel just to cut the lawn. We used a push mower that ran on human power. We exercised by working so we didn’t need to go to a brightly lit health club to run on treadmills that operate on electricity.

But we didn’t have the “Green Thing” back in our day, did we?

  • We drank from a water fountain when we were thirsty instead of using a plastic cup or bottle every time we had a drink.
  • We re-filled pens with ink instead of throwing the old one away and buying a new one.
  • We replaced the blades in a razor instead of throwing away the whole razor.

But we didn’t have the “Green Thing” back in our day, did we?

 

  • In our day, people took the bus to work or the shops and children rode their bikes to school or walked instead of turning their parents into a 24-hour taxi service in the family’s £50,000 ‘off-roader’, which incidentally, is the same price as you’d pay for a small family estate in our day.
  • We had one or maybe two electrical outlets in a room, not an entire bank of sockets to power the dozen appliances that nobody can possibly do without these days.
  • And we didn’t need a computerized gadget to receive a signal beamed from satellites 23,000 miles out in space in order to find the nearest ‘fast food’ takeaway.

 

But we didn’t have the “Green Thing” back in our day, did we?

 ***

I actually find it rather sad that the current generation laments how wasteful we, the older generation were and all because we didn’t have the “Green thing” back then.

Furthermore, I suggest this must be especially disappointing when confronted with a tattooed, multiply pierced, ideological, tree hugging, dread-lock sporting, going to put the world straight all on their own, smarty-pants, who has to get the cash register to tell them what change to give.

Oh dear, how sad, what a shame, never mind – as a close chum of mine once said!

This has been another Captain Corbett’s Adventure.  If I’m not on Jersey teaching a private tuition Day Skipper theory or Yachtmaster theory course, then I’m either spending time with someone on their boat, giving them the confidence to take their boat out with their family and friends on board or I’m off somewhere exotic delivering a boat. Either way, I’ll write it up and put it on the Blog for you all to see, so keep popping back to see my most recent adventures.

 

Busy, Busy, Busy!

Hello All!

My sincerest apologies for the lack of posts recently but with all the sea trials and boat movements going on at the moment it’s been rather hectic at work! Add to that all the prepartions for the Brixham office Grand Opening & Demo weekend on 6th & 7th April and you’ll have some idea as to why the posts are a little thin on the ground at the moment.

Do come along to Brixham if you get a chance, as it will be a great weekend out, with boats to try, experts to chat with and even a Raymarine VHF handset to win in a draw.

Brixham e-mail signature

 

Anyway, to make up for the lack of posts, here are two new ones together:  A new skipper’s tip and the SC35 handover in Jersey which I completed in August last year.

Don’t forget to keep dropping by, as I’ll be posting more skipper’s tips next month and the Grand East Coast Tour is the next big adventure to come…

This has been another Captain Corbett’s Adventure.  If I’m not on Jersey teaching a private tuition Day Skipper theory or Yachtmaster theory course, then I’m either spending time with someone on their boat, giving them the confidence to take their boat out with their family and friends on board or I’m off somewhere exotic delivering a boat. Either way, I’ll write it up and put it on the Blog for you all to see, so keep popping back to see my most recent adventures.

Breaking News

Here’s some interesting news which I’ve just come across; Sealine are updating the model range to make the ‘name’ truly reflect the size of the boat.  I’ve inserted the information below for everyone to see:

 

SEALINE UPDATES ITS MODEL RANGE

Sealine has today (13th February) announced changes to its model ranges in line with both current and future product development programmes. The new badging, which becomes effective this week, will reflect the true overall length of each boat

Commenting on the changes Bill Griffiths Managing Director of Sealine said

“It provides an important opportunity to offer consistency across all of our markets and brings to an end any confusion over the true size of each of our models. This initiative is part of a continuing programme of repositioning Sealine in line with our growing range of high quality, high spec and engineered innovative luxury motor boats. We have added new finishes and materials across all our ranges as well as some unique features which we believe offer today’s boater something that is truly different. I believe this new badging will help to redefine us further in our new direction.”

The Sealine models will be changed as follows:

New Model Name Previous model LOA (m) LOA (ft)
S380 SC35 11.83m 38’ 10”
S450 SC42 13.90 45’ 7”
F450 F42 13.90 45’ 8”
C490 C48 15.44 50’ 8”
F490 F48 15.44 50’ 8”
F380 F37 11.56 37’ 8” To be launched this Autumn

The T Series, T50 and T60, will keep their existing model names. A new Sealine brochure is now available as a CD or download and the Sealine website is being updated to reflect the changes.

For further media information please contact Sue Hardwick on 020 7499 8600 / 07710 260743 or email susan@hardwickpr.com

This has been another Captain Corbett’s Adventure.  If I’m not on Jersey teaching a private tuition Day Skipper theory or Yachtmaster theory course, then I’m either spending time with someone on their boat, giving them the confidence to take their boat out with their family and friends on board or I’m off somewhere exotic delivering a boat. Either way, I’ll write it up and put it on the Blog for you all to see, so keep popping back to see my most recent adventures.