2015 London Boat Show

Good morning all.  Just a quick note about my visit to the London Boat Show yesterday.

It was definitely good to go to the show, if only to catch up with some ex-Sealine colleagues and some of my other industry friends and acquaintances but one thing that really struck me was how small the show is now.  I remember when the show moved from Earl’s Court to Excel.  That first year both of the halls were packed to the gunwales with all things boating and if memory serves, the south hall was almost entirely given over to motor boats – how different it is now, shame.

The industry powerhouses, Sunseeker and Princess dominated the show.  Sadly the Sealine stand looked a little forlorn, a shadow of our heyday but nevertheless, it was good that they were there at all. What did surprise me was the Fairline stand; running along the end wall, with some lovely boats on show but again, not a patch on previous years stands – gone are the days of Fort Fairline then…a sensible belt tightening exercise in these difficult times I suspect.

The busiest area was, of course, the usual array of chandlers, sea schools and paraphernalia stands. Squirreled away amongst all this lot, was one particularly pleasing find, Motorboat Owner.  Neale and Claire, who some of you will know from their MBM days have set up a digital magazine aimed squarely at motor boaters.  This new offering is designed to bring insight and comment for all practical aspects of running a motor boat.  What’s more, it appears to be absolutely free – how could you resist not signing up?

All in all a worthwhile visit and an enjoyable day out – if you have the chance to go, do.  The industry is for you, the boaters of this world and if you don’t support it you will lose the flexibility and choice that come from having a buoyant (excuse the pun) industry.  If you don’t believe me, consider the high street shops that we all used to use…

This has been another Captain Corbett’s Adventure.  If I’m not on Jersey teaching a private tuition Day Skipper theory or Yachtmaster theory course, then I’m either spending time with someone on their boat, giving them the confidence to take their boat out with their family and friends on board or I’m off somewhere exotic delivering a boat. Either way, I’ll write it up and put it on the Blog for you all to see, so keep popping back to see my most recent adventures.

The next time you doubt your ability to do something…

Little Tommy Morrissey loves to play golf and he’s not going to let something like not having a complete right arm to get in his way.

I was sent this video recently and could barely believe what I saw when I played it.  This courageous young lad should be an inspiration to us all.

The next time you begin to doubt your ability to accomplish something, think about Tommy’s approach to difficult situations and then think again how you can overcome your own self-doubt.

Watch and be amazed…

http://player.theplatform.com/p/BxmELC/gc_player/select/I_6m3VpqoakQ

This has been another Captain Corbett’s Adventure.  If I’m not on Jersey teaching a private tuition Day Skipper theory or Yachtmaster theory course, then I’m either spending time with someone on their boat, giving them the confidence to take their boat out with their family and friends on board or I’m off somewhere exotic delivering a boat. Either way, I’ll write it up and put it on the Blog for you all to see, so keep popping back to see my most recent adventures.

Skipper’s Tips #10 – Sound Signals

Plotter picture

Happy New Year everyone!  Let’s hope 2015 turns out to be a great year for us all and certainly better than the last few years.  The current economic crisis has put a bit of a downer on a lot of people’s boating but the signs are that things are starting to get better; cheaper fuel is one good sign, keep your fingers crossed for less demanding times ahead…

For those of you who know me well, you’ll be aware that like everyone else I’ve had my own issues to deal with in the last few years.  Going from being fully employed to working freelance again has been a bit of a wrench but I recently had some good fortune come my way in the form of an ongoing contract to run a medium sized motor yacht in the Mediterranean. This certainly takes the pressure off financially and will, I’m sure, prove to be a bit of a hoot too!

Needless to say, you can expect many exciting adventures to come and naturally, my personal thoughts on a whole list of new anchorages and restaurants!

In the mean time, I think a new Skipper’s Tip is long overdue.  Given that it’s winter and we are, yet again, in the grips of some pretty fluffy weather I’ll consider some of the theoretical side to boating…

Sound Signals:

It has to be obvious to those of you who operate boats and are also car drivers that, for the most part, we do not travel down clearly laid out tracks, we are not all going the same way and we do not have brake lights and indicators to make other ‘drivers’ aware of our intentions.  So, how do we let other water users know what we are going to do next?

Clearly, if we are in an open stretch of water, with plenty of distance between ourselves and nearby boaters we can generally see what people are up to by studying their track over periods of 5 or 10 minute intervals – most boats tend to hold a steady course for the duration of their passages, only making turns as they avoid hazards or navigate down narrow channels and a significant alteration of course in an open water situation is quite easy to spot and allow for.  In fact, if you want to make your intentions clear to another vessel, making a bold turn in good time is by far the best approach to safe navigation – everyone can see what’s going on and there should be no need for last minute, panic manoeuvres.

However, we need to take a different approach when in sight of other vessels and in situations that don’t allow for ‘bold manoeuvres’, such as in a narrow channel, in a marina or in a harbour.  This is where sound signals take the place of vehicle indicators. Learning the various sound and light signals that vessels make is vitally important.  Although, as with all the rules of the road, it’s not enough to simply know what lights you are required to exhibit or what sound signals you might have to make, you must also be aware of the signals other shipping may show/sound and what action you should subsequently take.

Though often misused by friends signalling jovially to each other across the water, the horn is an essential navigational and safety tool, that is not to be used indiscriminately. A toot to your buddy could easily be misinterpreted by another craft as an intention to turn…

During periods of reduced visibility or whenever a vessel needs to signal its intentions or position, a horn is essential. There are different meanings attached to different sound sequences and to further complicate matters, some vessels will sound different sequences when in reduced visibility situations.

These sound signals are formed by both the length of blast and the number of blasts in a sequence.

By the way, a ‘Short blast’ = 1 second, and a ‘Long blast’ = 3 to 5 seconds or 4 to 6 seconds, depending on which book you read.

Some manoeuvring sound signals that you should already be familiar with are:

  • 1 short blast – I am turning to starboard
  • 2 short blasts – I am turning to port
  • 3 short blasts – My engines are going astern
  • 5 short blasts – I do not understand your intentions
  • 1 long last – I am coming (normally at a blind bend in a river)

Incidentally, a good way to remember the manoeuvring signals is to think of the word SPA, as in the spring water baths that we get in some UK towns like Harrogate, Bath and Leamington.

In other words, Starboard is 1 short blast, Port is 2 short blasts and Astern is 3 short blasts.

In fog/reduced visibility when we are not in sight of other vessels we use a different series of signals to let other water users know that we are about. Normal power driven vessels, not hampered in any way, will sound 1 long blast every two minutes.  Everyone else and this means sailing vessels and anyone who is hampered in some way will sound 1 long blast, followed immediately by 2 short blasts.  This second group, the sailing vessels and those hampered in some way, are sometimes affectionately known as the ‘Lame Ducks’.  There is a hierarchy into which these vessels fit, determining who ranks highest in terms of expecting other water users to give way to them. Starting at the bottom and working up to the vessels that can reasonably expect everyone to keep clear we have: sailing vessels, fishing vessels, towing vessels, vessels constrained by their draught, vessels restricted in their ability to manoeuvre and lastly, vessels not under command.

Of these ‘Lame Ducks’ the two that probably need some explanation are those that are restricted in their ability to manoeuvre and those NUC (not under command).  Some examples of the type of vessel that could be restricted in ability to manoeuvre would be; a towing vessel with a large or awkward tow (this outranks the ‘normal’ towing vessel, a vessel surveying, a vessel dredging and a vessel with a towed underwater array.  NUC (not under command), is a term used to describe a vessel that has lost all or some of its propulsion or ability to steer.  Clearly, this vessel is unable to comply with the normal avoidance procedures laid down in the COLREGS and therefore all other vessels must make every effort not to impede the safe passage of such a vessel.

So, your bedtime reading over the winter months might include a bit of revision on the Collision Regulations and it really ought to include learning, off by heart, the full list of sound signals.

On a more practical note, it’s worth keeping a portable air horn on your boat, in case the boat’s fixed horn fails.

Lastly, here’s one more sound signal for you to consider.  One long blast, followed by three short blasts. Look it up and let me know what it’s for…

Happy boating folks.  Keep looking in for new adventures and skipper’s tips. Don’t forget, you can always post any questions you have in the comments section of the blog and I’ll answer it as soon as I can.

This has been another Captain Corbett’s Adventure.  If I’m not on Jersey teaching a private tuition Day Skipper theory or Yachtmaster theory course, then I’m either spending time with someone on their boat, giving them the confidence to take their boat out with their family and friends on board or I’m off somewhere exotic delivering a boat. Either way, I’ll write it up and put it on the Blog for you all to see, so keep popping back to see my most recent adventures.