Images – Nov ’12

Hi folks.

I’m in Florida at the moment as we have some more guys from the world press looking at our latest models.  We’ve been in and out of Port Everglades in Fort Lauderdale with the F48 (keep an eye out for the Grand East Coast Tour adventure, which will be coming soon), the fabulous and definitely my personal favourite C48 and the SC38 (US version of the hugely popular SC35).

As I’m out here in the sun I thought the least I could do was take some pictures for those of you in not so sunny Europe; just to share some of the warmth of course…

To start, a little panorama of the famous Port Everglades and the 17th street bridge.  You wouldn’t believe the number of cruise ships that come in and out of this port. So, time for a quick competition now I reckon. Who knows which hotel this shot was taken from?

To help you out, here’s a picture taken from the back of the hotel…

Now, the boat featured in this next shot is not a Sealine!  Believe it or not, it’s Steven Spielberg’s little toy, Seven Seas.  Here’s a link I found which gives some details: http://www.bornrich.com/entry/steven-spielberg-sets-sail-on-seven-seas-his-new-200-million-toy/

Here are the boats we’ve been testing…

… and lastly, me getting a tad creative with the camera

If you have some pictures you’d like to share let me know and I’ll put them up. Obviously, as the blog is all about being on the water a maritime connection is important but don’t worry if you are not up to professional photographer standard (after all, I’m hardly David Bailey myself) it’s just great to see how you enjoy yourselves on and around the water.  If you have a story to go with the pictures, then all the better.

Please feel free to comment on any of the posts in the blog – I’d would love to hear all about your adventures.  If anyone has any questions I’m happy to answer those too, although I only profess to be any good at leisure boating, so don’t expect pearls of wisdom on subjects like politics, the economy, sartorial elegance or what time of year to prune fruit trees!

This has been another Captain Corbett’s Adventure.  If I’m not on Jersey teaching a private tuition Day Skipper theory or Yachtmaster theory course, then I’m either spending time with someone on their boat, giving them the confidence to take their boat out with their family and friends on board or I’m off somewhere exotic delivering a boat. Either way, I’ll write it up and put it on the Blog for you all to see, so keep popping back to see my most recent adventures.

Wet Weekend in Windermere

 

 

You’d be forgiven for thinking a wet weekend is what you are most likely to get when visiting Windermere for a couple of days – even the locals would be sagely nodding their heads and wearing a ‘well, what do you expect’ look on their faces…

But not this weekend!

We had wall to wall sunshine and it was fabulous!

Just look at this shot below of Derwent Water taken on Friday.

Windermere, in the southern part of the Lake District, is some kind of paradise.  Those who go boating here know all about the magic of being on the lake, constantly surrounded by the most stunning landscape and all the time watching it change with the seasons.  One thing is for certain, the locals are not in a hurry to share this with just anybody.  In fact, I suspect it was a mistake that the Sealine Experience weekend had been scheduled on these dates – I am absolutely certain that we were scheduled to get one of the wet weekends and it was only due to a clerical error that we ended up with one of the most beautiful weekends I’ve seen this year.

So, enough marvelling at the weather, let’s consider the event.  Everything had been arranged; the brand new SC42, which we were doing the demos on was all clean and shiny, the Sealine Experience trailer was all set up and importantly – you know my fondness for food – the ‘Hog Roast’ was just about to be fired up.  People were arriving by car or popping off their boats to shake hands and say hello.  There was definitely an atmosphere of ‘carnival’ in the air.

 

It wasn’t long before we set off on the first run of the day. Instantly, it became apparent just how ‘snug’ it is in the marina at Windermere.  Once we’d made our way through a couple of tight gaps the marina’s other idiosyncrasy also became clear, the very shallow water in the entrance channel – it was reading 0.2 metres below the props – gulp! Fortunately, half way down the channel it starts to get deeper and by the time we were level with the ferry there was plenty of water.

As we headed towards the southern end of the lake, chatting away about the boat and life in general, it started to make perfect sense to me why folk love to have a boat like the SC42 on the lake.  Yes, I know the speed limit is only 10 knots but you really don’t need to go fast to enjoy your boat.  We were actually bimbling along at 6 knots and it was fabulous.  The sun was streaming into the boat, it was warm but with a gentle breeze to stop it becoming stifling, all around us people were enjoying being on the water and if we hadn’t got a number of other bookings that day I’d have been happy to carry on until sunset.

Just then I noticed a group of boats rafted up in the bay, right in front of a beautiful house.  These guys really know how to use their boats properly.  There were people swimming (mad fools), people water-skiing, people sunbathing and every single one of them looked to be having a ball.

 

Needless to say, 5 o’clock soon came around and we tied up for the evening.

 

As we stepped ashore I could see the band getting ready to delight us with their guitar skills and vocal harmonies – well, perhaps not every member of the band would be in harmony…

It wasn’t long before our corner of the marina was buzzing.  People appeared from everywhere. The band gave their best rendition of well-known classics like ‘I’m a believer’ and ‘Jumpin’ Jack Flash’, whilst the queue for the food snaked its way down the car park.  Kids were dancing erratically to the music, in a way that only kids do and bottles of beer were being consumed at a comfortable rate – it was a wonderful spectacle and at the same time, a total justification for having a boat.

 

Eventually it came to an end, as all good things finally do.  Folk started to drift off and the clearing up started.

What a day, what a day!

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It would be hard to imagine Sunday being any better than Saturday but the slight drop in wind made manoeuvring in the marina that much easier and we had some younger Sealine fans come out on the water this time.

 

Richard Crocker, our Chief Naval Architect, is going to get an e-mail from the young man at the helm in the picture below, as he has some new boat designs that were created in his bedroom, which he thinks Richard just might be interested in; well, you never know…

Finally, the event was over for another year and we all headed home.  Driving back, I couldn’t help smiling to myself as I remembered the look on that young lad’s face when I told him to come up to the helm and drive – I think all his birthdays arrived at precisely that moment.

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I hope you enjoyed reading about this adventure in Windermere.  Please feel free to comment, either by clicking in the comments box or by clicking on the speech bubble by the heading on each post – it would be great to hear your thoughts and especially great to hear about your own adventures.

Don’t forget you can also find me on Twitter @Rich3591

 

Make sure you don’t miss my next big adventure when I hand over the first SC42 into North America.  Andy Colman and his lovely family have decided to keep their ‘new addition’ on Lake Charlevoix in Michigan.

This has been another Captain Corbett’s Adventure.  If I’m not on Jersey teaching a private tuition Day Skipper theory or Yachtmaster theory course, then I’m either spending time with someone on their boat, giving them the confidence to take their boat out with their family and friends on board or I’m off somewhere exotic delivering a boat. Either way, I’ll write it up and put it on the Blog for you all to see, so keep popping back to see my most recent adventures.

To share…

This marvellous piece of work by the BBC was sent to me the other day and I think I’d really like to share it…

It just goes to show how lucky we are to be a part of this great world and how much there is to see if you are prepared to go and look for it!

If you have anything wonderful like this to share, please send it to me.  It could be some type of adventure story or even a video of you and your family on holiday on your boat but whatever it is send to me as soon as you can and I’ll put it in this post for all to see.

This has been another Captain Corbett’s Adventure.  If I’m not on Jersey teaching a private tuition Day Skipper theory or Yachtmaster theory course, then I’m either spending time with someone on their boat, giving them the confidence to take their boat out with their family and friends on board or I’m off somewhere exotic delivering a boat. Either way, I’ll write it up and put it on the Blog for you all to see, so keep popping back to see my most recent adventures.

Images – Oct ’12

As many of you know, I am an avid photographer – yes, that’s correct, my life is not totally consumed by being on the water.  Therefore, I have decided to share my pictures with you as well as my adventures and my ‘handy’ skipper’s tips.

Naturally, the bulk of the shots have a maritime feel as being on or around the water is very important to me and they are not all shots of Sealines either!!!  However, over the years I have accumulated a number of images showing parts of Sealine boats; those of you with a trained and knowledgeable eye will undoubtedly be able to identify which models these shots are of…

If anyone has any pictures that they think would be suitable to show, please send them to me and I’ll put them up.

So, here are some to start the ball rolling:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Matthew_(ship)
Identify Sealine #1?

This has been another Captain Corbett’s Adventure.  If I’m not on Jersey teaching a private tuition Day Skipper theory or Yachtmaster theory course, then I’m either spending time with someone on their boat, giving them the confidence to take their boat out with their family and friends on board or I’m off somewhere exotic delivering a boat. Either way, I’ll write it up and put it on the Blog for you all to see, so keep popping back to see my most recent adventure.

Skipper’s Tips #1 – Anchoring

I wrote my ‘Skipper’s Tips’ some years ago and now that I have my very own blog I think it is about time we get to see them again.  These tips have proved very popular in the past so I will be publishing them on a regular basis alongside my adventures and my pictures.

I’m not sure what made me choose anchoring as the first of my ‘Skipper’s Tips’. Maybe it was because I had three separate anchoring tips to share and that fact alone made tips for anchoring seem somewhat important.  Having given this some thought,  I’m also aware that anchoring is the subject I get asked about more than any other boating technique.  For some reason it seems to scare the pants off people, and in fairness, the first time I anchored overnight I was more than a little apprehensive – I was crewing on a delivery trip from Ellos in Sweden to Cowes on a Hallberg-Rassy 39.  We had decided to pass through the top of Denmark, rather than run the gauntlet of the Skagarrak Strait, which lies between Norway and Denmark’s Jutland peninsula, this body of water is notorious for its potential ferocity.  This magical inland waterway has stopping off points set at ideal distances apart, which make for a leisurely three or four day run through to the North Sea.  All except for one leg that is and this is where we had to ride at anchor for the night. If memory serves, it took me rather a long time to get to sleep that night but the next morning we were in exactly the same position and I’ve been happy to sit at anchor ever since.

Anchoring #1

Anchoring is seen by some to be a ‘black art’, but it needn’t be. During the RYA Day Skipper course we go through anchoring in detail but here are a few tips to get you going and alleviate some of your fears.

  • When underway, attach a lanyard from the anchor to the boat/winch to stop the anchor deploying accidentally
  • If you have an electric windlass, only turn the windlass switch on when you are ready to anchor
  • Operate the anchor from the bow where you can see the anchor going up and down
  • For boats without a windlass, flake the chain out on deck before you put the anchor down, so that you can put out the correct amount of chain
  • Lay out a minimum of four times the depth of water for chain only
  • Lay out a minimum of six times the depth of water for a chain and warp mixture
  • As the tide rises and falls adjust the amount of chain/warp you have out
  • If your anchor drags put out more chain (If in doubt, let it out)
  • Never anchor on a lee shore – wind blowing on shore

Check your chart for the nature of the sea-bed; mud or sand offers better holding than weed, and unless you have a tripping line attached to the back of your anchor, you may lose it in rocks.

When you are ready to anchor, turn the boat into the wind/tide and stop (You should be pointing in the same direction as other boats anchored nearby). Let the anchor out until it touches the bottom and then drift gently backwards, laying the rest of the chain out as you go.

Use transits (two objects in a line) forward and on the beam to check that you are not dragging your anchor. If your anchor does drag, then lay out more chain/warp – this is why you should not anchor on a ‘lee’ shore.

 

The first time you decide to spend the night at anchor it can be very daunting but do try and summon the courage to try it.  Waking up in a sheltered bay, to a gorgeous sunrise and the gentle lapping of the sea on the hull is something quite wonderful…

 

My next tip will be Close Quarters Manoeuvring, don’t miss these upcoming words of wisdom!

This has been another Captain Corbett’s Adventure.  If I’m not on Jersey teaching a private tuition Day Skipper theory or Yachtmaster theory course, then I’m either spending time with someone on their boat, giving them the confidence to take their boat out with their family and friends on board or I’m off somewhere exotic delivering a boat. Either way, I’ll write it up and put it on the Blog for you all to see, so keep popping back to see my most recent adventure.